Galveston College receives $2.8 million National Science Foundation grant

Galveston College has received a five-year, $2,887,872 grant that focuses on enhancing the quality of undergraduate science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education and increasing the success rates of students pursuing associate and baccalaureate degrees in STEM.

The National Science Foundation Improving Undergraduate STEM Education: Hispanic-Serving Institutions Program grant will fund a project titled “Unified Community of Support: Building Capacity for STEM Transfer Students’ Success,” which aims to build institutional capacity between Galveston College and its partner university-transfer institutions through a unified community of support across a regional transfer alliance.

“This is a wonderful opportunity for Galveston College students and the Houston-Galveston community,” said Dr. Sandra Metoyer, co-principal investigator for the grant. “Galveston College is one of two community colleges in the nation to receive a grant in 2021 under the Institutional Transformation Project track.”

The funding will allow Galveston College to add a STEM transfer success adviser and a STEM Honors Program coordinator and to continue the STEM Honors Program, which was funded by a National Science Foundation grant in 2016.

“The funding will also enable the college to expand and strengthen co-curricular opportunities including the STEM Study Abroad program, renovate the STEM Student Center and provide students with at least $378,750 in National Science Foundation scholarship support that may be extended to their transfer universities,” said Dr. Ana Sanchez, principal investigator for the grant.

The expected results of the project include improved STEM advising, improved STEM teaching and mentoring, enhanced opportunities for co-curricular activities, more equitable participation and outcomes, improved student success, and long-term sustainable institutional structural change.

“This grant will provide significant opportunities to improve the overall university-transfer and success rates of our STEM students,” said Dr. Myles Shelton, Galveston College president. “Ultimately, the increased number of students with bachelor’s degrees in our region will have a tremendously positive effect on our local economy.”

Dr. Cissy Matthews, vice president for instruction at Galveston College, said, “This National Science Foundation award follows two prior successful NSF projects at Galveston College. This project builds on our prior work and success with those projects. We are grateful to NSF for once again recognizing the need for STEM education in Galveston and the Texas Gulf Coast.”

Above: Dr. Ana Sanchez and Dr. Sandra Metoyer accompany a group of Galveston College STEM students on a study-abroad trip to Costa Rica as part of the college’s National Science Foundation Improving Undergraduate STEM Education: Hispanic-Serving Institutions Program grant. The college recently received a five-year $2,887,872 NSF grant to build institutional capacity between Galveston College and its partner university-transfer institutions through a unified community of support across a regional transfer alliance.

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Hispanic-Serving Institutions Program under Grant 2122825.