Tag: Lecture Series

Dr. Susan Schoelwer

Galveston College lecture series to feature Mount Vernon’s executive director and senior curator

Executive Director of Historic Preservation and Collections and Robert H. Smith Senior Curator Dr. Susan P. Schoelwer of George Washington’s Mount Vernon will be the guest speaker for the third installment of the 2021 lecture series on Diversity, Inclusion and Empowerment at Galveston College.

The lecture titled “What Can We Learn from the Exhibit ‘Lives Bound Together: Slavery at George Washington’s Mount Vernon’?” will be presented virtually at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 16, via Zoom videoconference. It is free and open to the public.

Installation of the current, award-winning special exhibition “Lives Bound Together: Slavery at George Washington’s Mount Vernon” in 2016 marked a significant step in an ongoing process of recognizing and recovering the historical experiences of hundreds of enslaved people owned by George and Martha Washington in the 18th century.

In her presentation, Dr. Schoelwer will present an overview of the galleries and offer behind-the-scenes reflections on the development of the exhibition and related projects, lessons learned, and continuing efforts to offer a more inclusive interpretation of life on one of America’s best-known plantations and most-visited historic sites.

“The lecture by Dr. Schoelwer will provide a unique glimpse at less-known historical facts surrounding the first president of the United States George Washington with respect to slavery,” said Dr. Laimutis Bytautas, chair of the Faculty Professional Development Committee at Galveston College. “The information presented in this lecture will be very valuable in providing a proper understanding of the early days of the history of the United States.”

Dr. Schoelwer directs the architectural preservation, furnishing, and interpretation of George and Martha Washington’s house and surrounding plantation buildings and landscape, as well as the creation of museum exhibitions, including “Lives Bound Together.”

Prior to coming to Mount Vernon as curator in 2010, Dr. Schoelwer served for more than a decade as head of museum collections at the Connecticut Historical Society, where she authored “Connecticut Needlework: Women, Art and Family, 1740-1840,” winner of the 2011 Connecticut Book Award for Non-Fiction. She holds a Doctor of Philosophy in American studies from Yale University, a master’s degree from the Winterthur Program in Early American Culture at the University of Delaware and a Bachelor of Arts in history from the University of Notre Dame, where she participated in the historic transition to coeducation.

“On a daily basis, Dr. Schoelwer has the opportunity to draw upon documents and artifacts that bring to life the relationships between George Washington and the slaves who served him and Martha,” said Michael Berberich with the Faculty Professional Development Committee. “The insights Dr. Schoelwer brings to the topic from putting together the award-winning exhibit will be a unique contribution to the depth of our students’ education and will add new knowledge to the Galveston community as a whole.”

In addition to Mount Vernon and the Washingtons, Dr. Schoelwer has written and lectured on a variety of topics, including American art and decorative arts, needlework and women’s history. She is currently researching a book examining the creation and continuing re-creation of George Washington portraits.

To access the Feb. 16 lecture, visit the following Zoom link on the internet: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87079157421?pwd=QzhXR1E5UmR1Qlp3ZkR5MTZXYlF6dz09. The meeting ID is 870 7915 7421. The passcode is Galveston.

For more information, please contact Dr. Laimutis Bytautas, Faculty Professional Development Committee chair, at lbytautas@gc.edu or (409) 944-1273.

Dr. Susan Schoelwer

Mount Vernon historian to explore re-discoveries about George Washington

“A Historian’s Work is Never Done: Re-Discovering George Washington” is the focus of a lecture on Thursday, March 19, at 7 p.m. in the Abe and Annie Seibel Foundation Wing, 4015 Avenue Q, Galveston.

Speaker is Dr. Susan Schoelwer, executive director of historic preservation and collections and Robert H. Smith senior curator at George Washington’s Mount Vernon, who will explore “re-discoveries” about George Washington and his life at Mount Vernon.

The lecture is the second in the college’s 2019-2020 lecture series: Discovery: The Forefront of Knowledge. It is free and open to the public.

“Despite Washington having been studied and written about for more than two centuries, there are still unanswered questions, which I find fascinating,” said Dr. Schoelwer during a recent interview. “History is dynamic, not static, with new questions and new evidence frequently leading to new insights.”

Dr. Schoelwer directs the architectural preservation, furnishings and interpretation of George and Martha Washington’s house and surrounding plantation buildings and landscape, as well as the creation of museum exhibitions, including the current, award-winning special exhibition, Lives Bound Together: Slavery at George Washington’s Mount Vernon.

“We are thrilled to have Dr. Schoelwer present a lecture focusing on George Washington, the first president of the United States, and shedding a new light on his remarkable life and his contributions to this great country,” said Dr. Laimutis Bytautas, chair of the Faculty Professional Development Committee at Galveston College, sponsor of the lecture. “It has been nearly two and a half centuries since the presidency of George Washington, and having an opportunity to reflect on his life from a perspective of the 21st century is amazing.”

Growing up on a farm in Illinois, Dr. Schoelwer graduated with a high school class of 42, then went on to be among the first classes of women to graduate from the University of Notre Dame. She holds a master’s degree in American history and art history from the University of Delaware and Doctor of Philosophy in American studies from Yale. Prior to coming to Mount Vernon in 2010, she directed the museum collections at the Connecticut Historical Society and the special collections at the Chicago Public Library.

In addition to the Washingtons and Mount Vernon, her research projects have spanned a variety of topics, including Connecticut needlework, early American tavern signs, western American art, Chicago authors and the legacy of the Alamo for the exhibit, “Alamo Images: Changing Perspectives on a Texas Experience,” for the DeGolyer Library at Southern Methodist University and the Texas Humanities Council. She is currently researching a book re-examining the creation and continuing re-creation of George Washington portraits.

The Galveston College Culinary Arts Academy will provide refreshments for the evening.

“Finding Nemo’s Garden: Sea and Science in the Land of the Renaissance” with Paul Cater Deaton

Paul Cater Deaton is an award-winning writer, producer, director and cinematographer who has filmed on six continents over a 40-year career. He is based in Galveston, Texas, and works all over the
world. As an undersea filmmaker, Deaton  has spent more time underwater than most people spend in high school.

Recent credits include underwater cinematographer for Wild Honduras with Nigel Marven, field producer and director of photography with The Discovery Channel, director of photography with HBO Documentaries and principal underwater cinematographer for The Amazing Race. Deaton was one of the original three filmmakers selected to produce short documentaries for Ocean in Google Earth.

As a filmmaker and photojournalist, his work has been broadcast and published worldwide. He recently gave a highly-rated TEDx Talk on Shark Preservation, and was certified in Global Shark Biodiversity, Biology and Conservation through Cornell University and the University of Queensland, Australia.

Deaton is a National Fellow in The Explorers Club, and a full member of the Television Academy. Other memberships include Boston Sea Rovers, National Association of Underwater Instructors, Historical Diving Society, Underwater Archaeological Society of Chicago and the Rotary Club of St. Thomas East (Board of Directors). A Rotarian since 1989, he was honored with a Rotary International Paul Harris Fellowship in 2004.

Dr. Michael G. Smith

Lecture to focus on patterns and symmetry in math and poetry

Galveston College will present “Confluence: Patterns and Symmetry in Mathematics and Poetry,” a lecture featuring chemist and poet Dr. Michael G. Smith on Tuesday, Feb. 5, at 7 p.m. in the Abe and Annie Seibel Foundation Wing on the Galveston College campus, 4015 Ave. Q, Galveston, Texas.

The lecture is the third in the college’s 2018-19 lecture series, Our World and Beyond: The Integration of Modern Technology and the Humanities.

“Nature provides templates to visual artists and writers alike,” said Dr. Smith in describing his presentation. “It is also a springboard full of questions for mathematicians. For example, using numbers, equations or models, how does mathematics visualize an ocean coastline, the human circulatory system, or a sunflower’s seed pattern? Often mathematical visualizations finds their way into art and poetry.”

In this presentation, Dr. Smith will explore some of the ways poets and artists use mathematics and share how Fibonacci, sestina and fractal poems have arisen.

“We are very excited to have Dr. Smith who is an accomplished chemist and a poet to present at our lecture series this year on such, at first glance, different topics as mathematics and poetry,” said Dr. Laimutis Bytautas, chair of the Faculty Professional Development Committee at Galveston College.

“After a deeper look, surprisingly, the mathematical concept of symmetry that is frequently observed in nature and a concept of beauty found in arts and humanities are closely related. Dr. Smith is an excellent speaker to reveal the deep and mysterious link between symmetry and patterns in mathematics and poetry. We would like to welcome everybody to attend this exciting lecture.”

As a chemist, Dr. Smith has held research positions at the University of Texas at Austin, Los Alamos National Laboratory and Montana State University. He taught mathematics at Santa Fe Community College (New Mexico). His poetry, haiku, haibun and essays have been published in Borderlands: Texas Poetry Review, Cider Press Review, Crannóg, Nimrod, The Santa Fe Literary Review, Sin Fronteras, and other journals and anthologies. “No Small Things,” a volume of poetry, was published by Tres Chicas Books. “The Dippers Do Their Part,” a collaboration with visual artist Laura Young of haibun and katagami from their Shotpouch Cabin residency in the Coast Range of Oregon, was published by Miriam’s Well. “Flip Flop,” a collection of haiku co-written with Miriam Sagan, was also published by Miriam’s Well.

The Oregon Poetry Association selected his poem “Disturbance Theory” for its fall 2017 New Poets Award.

‘Stay Safe on Social Media’ featuring FBI Computer Scientist James Morrison

Galveston College will present “Stay Safe on Social Media,” a lecture featuring FBI Computer Scientist James Morrison, on Tuesday, Nov. 6, at 7 p.m. in the Abe and Annie Seibel Foundation Wing.

The lecture is part of college’s 2018-19 lecture series, “Our World and Beyond: The Integration of Modern Technology and the Humanities.”

Assigned to the Houston Division of the FBI, Morrison serves as a local technical expert to the special agents and task force officers assigned to the Houston Area Cyber Crimes Task Force. He assists in computer intrusion investigations and reverse engineers software to determine the source and purpose of the malignant code. He has worked in the IT field for more than 30 years, including 20 years with the FBI.

Prior to working with the FBI, Morrison was an engineer with Lockheed Martin at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, and UNIX/database administrator with the U.S. Air Force at Falcon Air Force Base (now Shriver AFB), Colorado, and Clark Air Base, Republic of the Philippines.

Morrison holds a Bachelor of Science in computer engineering from Colorado Tech University, a Master of Arts in U.S. history from the University of New Mexico and a Master of Business Administration from the University of Phoenix, as well as other professional certifications.

Elizabeth Ferris

“A World on the Move” featuring Dr. Elizabeth Ferris

Galveston College will present “A World on the Move,” a lecture featuring Georgetown University professor Dr. Elizabeth Ferris, on Wednesday, Oct. 10, at 7 p.m. in the Abe and Annie Seibel Foundation Wing at Galveston College, 4015 Avenue Q, Galveston, Texas.

The presentation will feature a global overview of migration and refugees and is part of college’s 2018-19 lecture series, “Our World and Beyond: The Integration of Modern Technology and the Humanities.”

Dr. Ferris is a research professor with the Institute for the Study of International Migration at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service. She is also a non-resident senior fellow in foreign policy at the Brookings Institution.

From January-September 2016, she also served as senior adviser to the UN General Assembly’s Summit for Refugees and Migrants in New York.

From 2006-2015, she was a senior fellow and co-director of the Brookings-LSE Project on Internal Displacement where she worked to support understanding and protection of internally displaced persons.

Prior to joining Brookings, she spent 20 years working in the field of humanitarian assistance, most recently in Geneva, Switzerland at the World Council of Churches. She has also served as the director of the Church World Service’s Immigration and Refugee Program, as research director for the Life & Peace Institute in Uppsala, Sweden, and as a Fulbright professor at the Universidad Autónoma de México.

Dr. Ferris’ teaching experience has included positions at Lafayette College, Miami University and Pembroke State University. She has written extensively on refugee, migration and humanitarian issues, including The Politics of Protection: The Limits of Humanitarian Action  (Brookings Institution Press, 2011) and most recently, Consequences of Chaos: Syria’s Humanitarian Crisis and the Failure to Protect, with Kemal Kirsici (Brookings Institution Press, 2016). She received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Duke University and her Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees from the University of Florida.

The lecture is free and open to the public.

Dr. Elizabeth Ferris speaker of

Georgetown University professor to speak on ‘A World on the Move’

Galveston College will present “A World on the Move,” a lecture featuring Georgetown University professor Dr. Elizabeth Ferris, on Wednesday, Oct. 10, at 7 p.m. in the Abe and Annie Seibel Foundation Wing at Galveston College, 4015 Avenue Q, Galveston, Texas.

Dr. Ferris is a research professor with the Institute for the Study of International Migration at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service. She is also a non-resident senior fellow in foreign policy at the Brookings Institution.

Her presentation will feature a global overview of migration and refugees and is part of college’s 2018-19 lecture series, “Our World and Beyond: The Integration of Modern Technology and the Humanities.”

“It is very exciting to have Dr. Ferris to give a lecture at Galveston College about her extensive experience and first-hand knowledge about UN missions around the world,” said Dr. Laimutis Bytautas, chair of the Faculty Professional Development Committee at Galveston College. “This is a unique opportunity for people in our community to learn about humanitarian issues that are of high importance in the world today.”

From January to September 2016, Dr. Ferris served as senior adviser to the UN General Assembly’s Summit for Refugees and Migrants in New York. From 2006 to 2015, she was a senior fellow and co-director of the Brookings-London School of Economics Project on Internal Displacement where she worked to support understanding and protection of internally displaced persons.

Prior to joining Brookings, she spent 20 years working in the field of humanitarian assistance, most recently in Geneva, Switzerland, at the World Council of Churches. She has also served as the director of the Church World Service’s Immigration and Refugee Program, as research director for the Life & Peace Institute in Uppsala, Sweden, and as a Fulbright professor at the Universidad Autónoma de México.

Dr. Ferris’ teaching experience has included positions at Lafayette College, Miami University and Pembroke State University. She has written extensively on refugee, migration and humanitarian issues, including “The Politics of Protection: The Limits of Humanitarian Action” (Brookings Institution Press, 2011) and most recently, “Consequences of Chaos: Syria’s Humanitarian Crisis and the Failure to Protect,” with Kemal Kirsici (Brookings Institution Press, 2016).

She received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Duke University and her Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees from the University of Florida.

The lecture is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.

Guest speaker will be Vivian Cadbury

Galveston College Coastal Culinary Lecture to feature ‘The Art of Hunger’

Galveston College will present the last talk in its Coastal Culinary Lecture Series: Exploring Food Narratives on Thursday, May 3, at 7:30 p.m. in Room 207 of the Galveston College Fine Arts Building, 4015 Avenue Q, Galveston, Texas.

Guest speaker will be Vivian Cadbury, associate professor of writing and communications at The Culinary Institute of America, who will discuss “The Art of Hunger.”

“Hunger is perhaps one of our most basic metaphors. Just as we hunger for food, we hunger for love, beauty, knowledge, freedom and justice,” said Cadbury in describing her presentation. “These hungers can drive us to extraordinary accomplishments or turn us towards madness and death. For example, physical and emotional hungers seem inevitable, and fictional characters struggle desperately to satisfy them. Hunger can also be a deliberate spiritual or political choice, however, as in a fast, hunger strike, or through merciless subjugation. We readers hunger, too, for words and images, stories and metaphors that help us make sense of our lives.”

Dr. Shane Wallace, associate professor of English and coordinator of English and Humanities at Galveston College, said, “We are excited to bring Vivian to Galveston to hear her perspectives drawing from the language of food and cooking. We hope the community will join us as we wrap up this successful series of presentations.”

Cadbury received a Master of Arts and Bachelor of Arts with honors and highest distinction in English from the University of Illinois at Chicago. She also completed graduate research at the University of Oxford in Oxford, U.K.

Prior to joining The Culinary Institute of America, she served as an adjunct instructor at Ulster County Community College in Stone Ridge, New York and Dutchess Community College in Poughkeepsie, New York. She also tutored students at Oakwood School in Poughkeepsie and was an educational writer for Queue, Inc. in Bridgeport, Connecticut, an English teacher at The Doane Stuart School in Albany, New York, and an English teacher in Hyde Park and Millbrook, New York, school districts.

She received the People’s Choice Award-Best Poster at A Taste for Writing, Food Service Educators Network International in 2008 and is the author of “A Taste for Writing: Composition for Culinarians.”

Cadbury is a member of the National Council of Teachers of English, the Conference on College Composition and Communication and the National Association for Developmental Education.

The free lecture is open to the public and is funded by a generous grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

For more information about the lecture, contact Dr. Shane Wallace at (409) 944-1321 or swallace@gc.edu.

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