Tag: Lecture

Discovery of new dinosaur is topic of Galveston College lecture

Galveston College will present a lecture about the discovery of a new dinosaur species, “A new dinosaur relative from the beginning of the age of dinosaurs in northern Colorado,” on Wednesday, Nov. 6, at 7 p.m. in the Abe and Annie Seibel Foundation Wing at Galveston College, 4015 Avenue Q, Galveston, Texas.

Speaker is Dr. Jeffrey W. Martz, assistant professor of geology at the University of Houston-Downtown, who recently helped discover a new species of dinosaur called Kwanasaurus williamparkeri, a dinosauromorph about as large as a medium-sized dog.

“This year the lecture series at Galveston College is focused on discoveries and to learn that new discoveries about dinosaurs can happen anytime is quite fascinating,” said Dr. Laimutis Bytautas, chair of the Faculty Professional Development Committee, which organizes the lecture series.

“Many of us might think that we know almost everything about these creatures that lived many millions of years ago just to find out that this is not exactly true. In fact, there are so many things we still do not know about these animals that became extinct a long time ago. This lecture is an exciting opportunity for everybody to learn about dinosaurs and their lives from a researcher who makes these discoveries. We welcome everybody to attend this exciting lecture.”

Dr. Martz was born in Denver, Colorado, and grew up primarily in the Denver and Salida regions of Colorado. He began his studies in paleontology as an intern at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science while still attending high school, and worked at Ashfall Fossil Beds in Nebraska in 1994 before attending Colorado State University in Fort Collins.

The lecture is the second in the college’s 2019-20 lecture series: Discovery: The Forefront of Knowledge. It is free and open to the public.

The Galveston College Culinary Arts Academy will provide refreshments for the evening.

Texas and Texans During World War II

Lecture: “Texas and Texans During World War II” featuring Bill O’Neal

Galveston College will present “Texas and Texans During World War II,” a lecture featuring distinguished Texas historian Bill O’Neal on Wednesday, Oct. 16, at 7 p.m. in the Abe and Annie Seibel Foundation Wing at Galveston College, 4015 Avenue Q, Galveston, Texas.

The lecture is the first in the college’s 2019-20 lecture series. It is free and open to the public.

A longtime professor at Panola College in Carthage, Texas, O’Neal recently concluded six years of service as State Historian of Texas, traveling tens of thousands of miles across the Lone Star State as an ambassador for Texas history. He is a past president and fellow of both the East Texas Historical Association and the West Texas Historical Association.

“We are very excited to have such an outstanding speaker as Bill O’Neal present at our lecture series this year,” said Dr. Laimutis Bytautas, chair of the Faculty Professional Development Committee at Galveston College. “The theme for this year is ‘Discovery: The Forefront of Knowledge.’ We hope that anyone attending this lecture will discover something new about Texas history.”

Committee co-chair Michael Berberich agreed. “Like documentary filmmaker Ken Burns, Bill O’Neal is that kind of scholar who readily connects with broad popular audiences. His years of teaching, his more than 40 books and his many honors have done community colleges proud.”

“Texas made a remarkable contribution to the American war effort during World War II,” said O’Neal in describing his presentation. “Almost 830,000 Texans, including 12,000 women, donned uniforms, and more than 23,000 Texas fighting men died for their country. America’s most decorated soldier, Lt. Audie Murphy, and most decorated sailor, submarine commander Sam Dealey, both were Texans.

“Texas A&M, an all-male military college, placed over 20,000 men in the armed forces, of which 14,000 were officers – more than any other school in the nation. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, the supreme commander of Allied forces in Europe, was born in Denison in northeast Texas. Adm. Chester Nimitz, commander in chief of the Pacific Fleet, was born and raised in the Texas Hill Country. With more than 80 military bases of every type, Texas was the largest training field in the nation. Texas oil fueled the Allied war effort, while Texas shipyards and defense plants provided a flood of war machines and munitions.”

O’Neal’s father was a veteran of World War II. Through his college students, he has collected several hundred interviews from WW II veterans, and two of his books have been about Texans in the Second World War.

In addition to more than 40 books, O’Neal has written over 300 articles and book reviews. His most recent writing award, the A.C. Greene Literary Award, was presented at the 2015 West Texas Book Festival in Abilene. In 2012, he received the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Wild West Historical Association, and in 2007 he was named True West Magazine’s Best Living Non-Fiction Writer.

O’Neal has appeared on TV documentaries on TBS, The History Channel, CMT, The Learning Channel, A&E and the American Heroes Channel.

During a long career on the faculty at Panola College at Carthage, Texas, his most prestigious teaching award was a Piper Professorship, presented in 2000. In 2013 Panola’s new dormitory was named “Bill O’Neal Hall,” and in that same year he received an honorary Doctor of Letters degree from Texas A&M University-Commerce.

O’Neal’s four daughters all have entered the field of education, and he is the proud grandfather of seven grandchildren.

Distinguished Texas historian to speak at Galveston College on ‘Texas and Texans During World War II’

Galveston College will present “Texas and Texans During World War II,” a lecture featuring distinguished Texas historian Bill O’Neal on Wednesday, Oct. 16, at 7 p.m. in the Abe and Annie Seibel Foundation Wing at Galveston College, 4015 Avenue Q, Galveston, Texas.

The lecture is the first in the college’s 2019-20 lecture series. It is free and open to the public.

A longtime professor at Panola College in Carthage, Texas, O’Neal recently concluded six years of service as State Historian of Texas, traveling tens of thousands of miles across the Lone Star State as an ambassador for Texas history. He is a past president and fellow of both the East Texas Historical Association and the West Texas Historical Association.

“We are very excited to have such an outstanding speaker as Bill O’Neal present at our lecture series this year,” said Dr. Laimutis Bytautas, chair of the Faculty Professional Development Committee at Galveston College. “The theme for this year is ‘Discovery: The Forefront of Knowledge.’ We hope that anyone attending this lecture will discover something new about Texas history.”

Committee co-chair Michael Berberich agreed. “Like documentary filmmaker Ken Burns, Bill O’Neal is that kind of scholar who readily connects with broad popular audiences. His years of teaching, his more than 40 books and his many honors have done community colleges proud.”

“Texas made a remarkable contribution to the American war effort during World War II,” said O’Neal in describing his presentation. “Almost 830,000 Texans, including 12,000 women, donned uniforms, and more than 23,000 Texas fighting men died for their country. America’s most decorated soldier, Lt. Audie Murphy, and most decorated sailor, submarine commander Sam Dealey, both were Texans.

“Texas A&M, an all-male military college, placed over 20,000 men in the armed forces, of which 14,000 were officers – more than any other school in the nation. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, the supreme commander of Allied forces in Europe, was born in Denison in northeast Texas. Adm. Chester Nimitz, commander in chief of the Pacific Fleet, was born and raised in the Texas Hill Country. With more than 80 military bases of every type, Texas was the largest training field in the nation. Texas oil fueled the Allied war effort, while Texas shipyards and defense plants provided a flood of war machines and munitions.”

O’Neal’s father was a veteran of World War II. Through his college students, he has collected several hundred interviews from WW II veterans, and two of his books have been about Texans in the Second World War.

In addition to more than 40 books, O’Neal has written over 300 articles and book reviews. His most recent writing award, the A.C. Greene Literary Award, was presented at the 2015 West Texas Book Festival in Abilene. In 2012, he received the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Wild West Historical Association, and in 2007 he was named True West Magazine’s Best Living Non-Fiction Writer.

O’Neal has appeared on TV documentaries on TBS, The History Channel, CMT, The Learning Channel, A&E and the American Heroes Channel.

During a long career on the faculty at Panola College at Carthage, Texas, his most prestigious teaching award was a Piper Professorship, presented in 2000. In 2013 Panola’s new dormitory was named “Bill O’Neal Hall,” and in that same year he received an honorary Doctor of Letters degree from Texas A&M University-Commerce.

O’Neal’s four daughters all have entered the field of education, and he is the proud grandfather of seven grandchildren.

Dr. Michael G. Smith

Lecture to focus on patterns and symmetry in math and poetry

Galveston College will present “Confluence: Patterns and Symmetry in Mathematics and Poetry,” a lecture featuring chemist and poet Dr. Michael G. Smith on Tuesday, Feb. 5, at 7 p.m. in the Abe and Annie Seibel Foundation Wing on the Galveston College campus, 4015 Ave. Q, Galveston, Texas.

The lecture is the third in the college’s 2018-19 lecture series, Our World and Beyond: The Integration of Modern Technology and the Humanities.

“Nature provides templates to visual artists and writers alike,” said Dr. Smith in describing his presentation. “It is also a springboard full of questions for mathematicians. For example, using numbers, equations or models, how does mathematics visualize an ocean coastline, the human circulatory system, or a sunflower’s seed pattern? Often mathematical visualizations finds their way into art and poetry.”

In this presentation, Dr. Smith will explore some of the ways poets and artists use mathematics and share how Fibonacci, sestina and fractal poems have arisen.

“We are very excited to have Dr. Smith who is an accomplished chemist and a poet to present at our lecture series this year on such, at first glance, different topics as mathematics and poetry,” said Dr. Laimutis Bytautas, chair of the Faculty Professional Development Committee at Galveston College.

“After a deeper look, surprisingly, the mathematical concept of symmetry that is frequently observed in nature and a concept of beauty found in arts and humanities are closely related. Dr. Smith is an excellent speaker to reveal the deep and mysterious link between symmetry and patterns in mathematics and poetry. We would like to welcome everybody to attend this exciting lecture.”

As a chemist, Dr. Smith has held research positions at the University of Texas at Austin, Los Alamos National Laboratory and Montana State University. He taught mathematics at Santa Fe Community College (New Mexico). His poetry, haiku, haibun and essays have been published in Borderlands: Texas Poetry Review, Cider Press Review, Crannóg, Nimrod, The Santa Fe Literary Review, Sin Fronteras, and other journals and anthologies. “No Small Things,” a volume of poetry, was published by Tres Chicas Books. “The Dippers Do Their Part,” a collaboration with visual artist Laura Young of haibun and katagami from their Shotpouch Cabin residency in the Coast Range of Oregon, was published by Miriam’s Well. “Flip Flop,” a collection of haiku co-written with Miriam Sagan, was also published by Miriam’s Well.

The Oregon Poetry Association selected his poem “Disturbance Theory” for its fall 2017 New Poets Award.

Student Success Seminar to focus on communication

How do you make a great first impression? How do you come across as confident and powerful?  How do you know if someone is lying to you?

Come learn about how to read other people’s nonverbal behavior and how to better manage your own nonverbal communication at Galveston College on Wednesday, March 21, from 3-4 p.m. in the Abe and Annie Seibel Foundation Wing-West at Galveston College, 4015 Avenue Q, Galveston, Texas.

Janene Davison, assistant professor of speech and coordinator of the Communications program, will be the featured speaker for this Student Success Seminar. Her presentation is titled “Read Others Better: Nonverbal Communication and Power.”

The seminar is sponsored by the Student Activities office at Galveston College. For more information, contact Cynthia Parra at (409) 944-1234 or cparra@gc.edu.

Lecture: “Reading Personal Stories Through Recipes”

Coastal Culinary Lecture Series

Reading Personal Stories Through Recipes: Foodways, Culinary Relativism, and Chili in the American Midwest

A Lecture Presented by Lucy Long, Ph.D., Founder and Director of the Center for Food and Culture.

Contact: David Shane Wallace, Ph.D. 409-944-1321 or dwallace@gc.edu.

Reading Personal Stories Through Recipes, a Coastal Culinary Lecture by Lucy Long

Lecture: “The Cutting Edge of Copyright: The Developing Law of the Classroom”

Professor Michael A. OlivasFaculty Professional Development Lecture at Galveston College

The Lecture presented by Professor Michael A. Olivas, William B. Bates Distinguished Chair of Law, Director; Institute for Higher Education Law & Governance University of Houston Law Center.

(Please note, this event is open to Galveston College Faculty and Staff only.)

 

Galveston College sets lecture on the brain and behavior

Dr. Tammy CupitThe Fascinating World of the Brain and Behavior” will be the focus of a presentation in the 2017-18 Galveston College Lecture Series on “The Brain” on Tuesday, Feb. 13, at 7 p.m. in the Abe and Annie Seibel Foundation Wing on the Galveston College campus, 4015 Avenue Q, Galveston, Texas.

The guest speaker will be Dr. Tammy Cupit, director of Nursing Science and Innovation at UTMB Health.

Dr. Cupit is an avid nurse scientist and has been both a principal and co-investigator in over half a dozen single and multi-site nursing research studies resulting in national and international presentations as well as publications that include a policy brief and the first coauthored study published in the United States examining front-line operational failures detected by medical-surgical nurses during their usual work shifts.

She serves on the Institutional Review Board and the Institutional Ethics Committee, is vice chair of the Institutional Conflict of Interest Committee and chair of the Nursing Peer Review Committee for the entire UTMB Health System and has an adjunct associate professor appointment with the UTMB School of Nursing.

Dr. Cupit has received numerous awards over the past several years, including a community service award, two Good Samaritan Excellence in Nursing awards, the Sigma Theta Tau International Excellence in Mentoring award and the UTMB Anna Pearl Rains Nursing Leadership Award.

She is active in professional organizations, including the American Nurses Association, the Texas Nurses Association and the Association for Nursing Professional Development, chairs the Texas Medical Center’s Nursing Science Research Collaborative and volunteers with CASA, CPS and local schools where she collaborates with fellow nurses to provide family life and sexual health education.

The free lecture is open to the public.